APT

From Amachu
Jump to: navigation, search

Apt (for Advanced Package Tool) is a set of core tools inside Debian. Apt makes it possible to:

  • Install applications
  • Remove applications
  • Keep applications up to date

Apt, which basically resolves problems of dependencies and retrieves the requested packages, works with dpkg, another tool, which handles the actual installation and removal of packages (applications). Apt is very powerful, and is primarily used on the command line (console/terminal). There are, however, many GUI/Graphical tools to let you use Apt without having to touch the command line.

There is also aptitude for interaction with the package management. APT tools can be used for specific management actions that may not be covered by aptitude, or where the latter behaves more aggressively with dependencies.

Contents

The /etc/apt/sources.list file

As part of its operation, APT uses a file that lists the 'sources' from which packages can be obtained. This file is /etc/apt/sources.list.

The entries in this file normally follow this format:

     deb http://host/debian distribution section1 section2 section3
     deb-src http://host/debian distribution section1 section2 section3

Of course, the above entries are fictitious and should not be used. The first word on each line, deb or deb-src, indicates the type of archive: whether it contains binary packages (deb), that is, the pre-compiled packages that we normally use, or source packages (deb-src), which are the original program sources plus the Debian control file (.dsc) and the diff.gz containing the changes needed for `debianizing' the program.

We usually find the following in the default Debian sources.list:

     # See sources.list(5) for more information, especially
     # Remember that you can only use http, ftp or file URIs
     # CDROMs are managed through the apt-cdrom tool.
     deb http://http.us.debian.org/debian stable main contrib non-free
     deb http://non-us.debian.org/debian-non-US stable/non-US main contrib non-free
     deb http://security.debian.org stable/updates main contrib non-free
     
     # Uncomment if you want the apt-get source function to work
     #deb-src http://http.us.debian.org/debian stable main contrib non-free
     #deb-src http://non-us.debian.org/debian-non-US stable/non-US main contrib non-free

These are the lines needed by a basic Debian install. The first deb line points to the official archive, the second to the non-US archive and the third to the archive of Debian security updates.

The two last lines are commented out (with a `#' in front), so apt-get will ignore them. These are deb-src lines, that is, they point to Debian source packages. If you often download program sources for testing or recompiling, uncomment them.

The /etc/apt/sources.list file can contain several types of lines. APT knows how to deal with archives of types http, ftp, file (local files, e.g., a directory containing a mounted ISO9660 filesystem) and ssh, that I know of.

Do not forget to run apt-get update after modifying the /etc/apt/sources.list file. You must do this to let APT obtain the package lists from the sources you specified.

How to use APT locally

Sometimes you have lots of packages .deb that you would like to use APT to install so that the dependencies would be automatically solved.

To do that create a directory and put the .debs you want to index in it . For example:

     # mkdir /root/debs

You may modify the definitions set on the package's control file directly for your repository using an override file. Inside this file you may want to define some options to override the ones that come with the package. It looks like follows:

     package priority section

package is the name of the package, priority is low, medium or high and section is the section to which it belongs. The file name does not matter, you'll have to pass it as an argument for dpkg-scanpackages later. If you do not want to write an override file, just use /dev/null. when calling dpkg-scanpackages.

Still in the /root directory do:

     # dpkg-scanpackages debs file | gzip > debs/Packages.gz

In the above line, file is the override file, the command generates a file Packages.gz that contains various information about the packages, which are used by APT. To use the packages, finally, add:

     deb file:/root debs/

After that just use the APT commands as usual. You may also generate a sources repository. To do that use the same procedure, but remember that you need to have the files .orig.tar.gz, .dsc and .diff.gz in the directory and you have to use Sources.gz instead of Packages.gz. The program used is also different. It is dpkg-scansources. The command line will look like this:

     # dpkg-scansources debs | gzip > debs/Sources.gz

Notice that dpkg-scansources doesn't need an override file. The sources.list's line is:

     deb-src file:/root debs/

Adding a CD-ROM to the sources.list file

If you'd rather use your CD-ROM for installing packages or updating your system automatically with APT, you can put it in your sources.list. To do so, you can use the apt-cdrom program like this:

     # apt-cdrom add

with the Debian CD-ROM in the drive. It will mount the CD-ROM, and if it's a valid Debian CD it will look for package information on the disk. If your CD-ROM configuration is a little unusual, you can also use the following options:

     -h           - program help
     -d directory - CD-ROM mount point
     -r           - Rename a recognized CD-ROM
     -m           - No mounting
     -f           - Fast mode, don't check package files
     -a           - Thorough scan mode

For example:

     # apt-cdrom -d /home/kov/mycdrom add

You can also identify a CD-ROM, without adding it to your list:

     # apt-cdrom ident

Note that this program only works if your CD-ROM is properly configured in your system's /etc/fstab.

Updating the list of available packages

The packaging system uses a private database to keep track of which packages are installed, which are not installed and which are available for installation. The apt-get program uses this database to find out how to install packages requested by the user and to find out which additional packages are needed in order for a selected package to work properly.

To update this list, you would use the command apt-get update. This command looks for the package lists in the archives found in /etc/apt/sources.list

Installing packages

Finally, the process you've all been waiting for! With your sources.list ready and your list of available packages up to date, all you have to do is run apt-get to get your desired package installed. For example, you can run:
     # apt-get install xchat

APT will search it's database for the most recent version of this package and will retrieve it from the corresponding archive as specified in sources.list. In the event that this package depends on another -- as is the case here -- APT will check the dependencies and install the needed packages. See this example:

     # apt-get install nautilus
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following extra packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 
     The following NEW packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 nautilus 
     0 packages upgraded, 4 newly installed, 0 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 8329kB of archives. After unpacking 17.2MB will be used.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

The package nautilus depends on the shared libraries cited, therefore APT will get them from the archive. If you had specified the names of these libraries on the apt-get command line, APT would not have asked if you wanted to continue; it would automatically accept that you wanted to install all of those packages.

This means that APT only asks for confirmation when it needs to install packages which weren't specified on the command line.

The following options to apt-get may be useful:

     -h  This help text.
     -d  Download only - do NOT install or unpack archives
     -f  Attempt to continue if the integrity check fails
     -s  No-act. Perform ordering simulation
     -y  Assume Yes to all queries and do not prompt
     -u  Show a list of upgraded packages as well

Multiple packages may be selected for installation in one line. Files downloaded from the network are placed in the directory /var/cache/apt/archives for later installation.

You can specify packages to be removed on the same command line, as well. Just put a '-' immediately after the name of the package to be removed, like this:

     # apt-get install nautilus gnome-panel-       
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following extra packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 
     The following packages will be REMOVED:
       gnome-applets gnome-panel gnome-panel-data gnome-session 
     The following NEW packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 nautilus 
     0 packages upgraded, 4 newly installed, 4 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 8329kB of archives. After unpacking 2594kB will be used.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

If you somehow damage an installed package, or simply want the files of a package to be reinstalled with the newest version that is available, you can use the --reinstall option like so:

     # apt-get --reinstall install gdm
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 1 reinstalled, 0 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 0B/182kB of archives. After unpacking 0B will be used.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

Removing packages

If you no longer want to use a package, you can remove it from your system using APT. To do this just type: apt-get remove package. For example:

     # apt-get remove gnome-panel
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following packages will be REMOVED:
       gnome-applets gnome-panel gnome-panel-data gnome-session 
     0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 4 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 14.6MB will be freed.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

As you can see in the above example, APT also takes care of removing packages which depend on the package you have asked to remove. There is no way to remove a package using APT without also removing those packages that depend on it.

Running apt-get as above will cause the packages to be removed but their configuration files, if any, will remain intact on the system. For a complete removal of the package, run:

     # apt-get --purge remove gnome-panel
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following packages will be REMOVED:
       gnome-applets* gnome-panel* gnome-panel-data* gnome-session* 
     0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 4 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 14.6MB will be freed.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

Note the '*' after the names. This indicates that the configuration files for each of these packages will also be removed.

Just as in the case of the install method, you can use a symbol with remove to invert the meaning for a particular package. In the case of removing, if you add a '+' right after the package name, the package will be installed instead of being removed.

     # apt-get --purge remove gnome-panel nautilus+
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following extra packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 nautilus 
     The following packages will be REMOVED:
       gnome-applets* gnome-panel* gnome-panel-data* gnome-session* 
     The following NEW packages will be installed:
       bonobo libmedusa0 libnautilus0 nautilus 
     0 packages upgraded, 4 newly installed, 4 to remove and 1  not upgraded.
     Need to get 8329kB of archives. After unpacking 2594kB will be used.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

Note that apt-get lists the extra packages which will be installed (that is, the packages whose installation is needed for the proper functioning of the package whose installation has been requested), those which will be removed, and those which will be installed (including the extra packages again).

Upgrading packages

Package upgrades are a great success of the APT system. They can be achieved with a single command: apt-get upgrade. You can use this command to upgrade packages within the same distribution, as well as to upgrade to a new distribution, although for the latter the command apt-get dist-upgrade is preferred; see section Upgrading to a new release, Section 3.5 for more details.

It's useful to run this command with the -u option. This option causes APT to show the complete list of packages which will be upgraded. Without it, you'll be upgrading blindly. APT will download the latest versions of each package and will install them in the proper order. It's important to always run apt-get update before you try this. See section Updating the list of available packages, Section 3.1. Look at this example:

     # apt-get -u upgrade
     Reading Package Lists... Done
     Building Dependency Tree... Done
     The following packages have been kept back
       cpp gcc lilo 
     The following packages will be upgraded
       adduser ae apt autoconf debhelper dpkg-dev esound esound-common ftp indent
       ipchains isapnptools libaudiofile-dev libaudiofile0 libesd0 libesd0-dev
       libgtk1.2 libgtk1.2-dev liblockfile1 libnewt0 liborbit-dev liborbit0
       libstdc++2.10-glibc2.2 libtiff3g libtiff3g-dev modconf orbit procps psmisc 
     29 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 3 not upgraded.
     Need to get 5055B/5055kB of archives. After unpacking 1161kB will be used.
     Do you want to continue? [Y/n]

The process is very simple. Note that in the first few lines, apt-get says that some packages were kept back. This means that there are new versions of these packages which will not be installed for some reason. Possible reasons are broken dependencies (a package on which it depends doesn't have a version available for download) or new dependencies (the package has come to depend on new packages since the last version).

There's no clean solution for this first case. For the second case, it's sufficient to run apt-get install for the specific package in question, as this will download the dependencies. An even cleaner solution is to use dist-upgrade.

Upgrading to a new release

This feature of APT allows you to upgrade an entire Debian system at once, either through the Internet or from a new CD (purchased or downloaded as an ISO image).

It is also used when changes are made to the relationships between installed packages. With apt-get upgrade, these packages would be kept untouched (kept back).

# apt-get -u dist-upgrade

How to keep specific versions of packages installed (complex)

You may have occasion to modify something in a package and don't have time or don't want to port those changes to a new version of the program. Or, for instance, you may have just upgraded your Debian distribution to 3.0, but want to continue with the version of a certain package from Debian 2.2. You can "pin" the version you have installed so that it will not be upgraded.

Using this resource is simple. You just need to edit the file /etc/apt/preferences.

The format is simple:

     Package: <package>
     Pin: <pin definition>
     Pin-Priority: <pin's priority>

Each entry must be separated from any other entries by a blank line. For example, to keep package sylpheed that I have modified to use "reply-to-list" at version 0.4.99, I add:

     Package: sylpheed
     Pin: version 0.4.99*

Note that I used an * (asterisk). This is a "wildcard"; it say that I want that this "pin" to be valid for all versions beginning with 0.4.99. This is because Debian versions its packages with a "Debian revision" and I don't want to avoid the installation of these revisions. So, for instance, versions 0.4.99-1 and 0.4.99-10 will be installed as soon as they are made available. Note that if you modified the package you won't want to do things this way.

The pin priority helps determine whether a package matching the "Packages:" and "Pin:" lines will be installed, with higher priorities making it more likely that a matching package will be installed. You can read apt_preferences(7) for a thorough discussion of priorities, but a few examples should give the basic idea. The following describes the effect of setting the priority field to different values in the sylpheed example above.

1001

   Sylpheed version 0.4.99 will never be replaced by apt. If available, apt will install version 0.4.99 even if it would replace an installed package with a higher version. Only packages of priority greater than 1000 will ever downgrade an existing package.

1000

   The effect is the same as priority 1001, except that apt will refuse to downgrade an installed version to 0.4.99

990

   Version 0.4.99 will be replaced only by a higher version available from a release designated as preferred using the "APT::Default-Release" variable (see How to keep a mixed system, Section 3.8, above).

500

   Any version higher than 0.4.99 of sylpheed which is available from any release will take preference over version 0.4.99, but 0.4.99 will still be preferred to a lower version.

100

   Higher versions of sylpheed available from any release will take preference over version 0.4.99, as will any installed higher version of slypheed; so 0.4.99 will be installed only if no version is installed already. This is the priority of installed packages.

-1

   Negative priorities are allowed as well, and prevent 0.4.99 from ever being installed.

A pin can be specified on a package's version, release or origin.

Pinning on a version, as we have seen, supports literal version numbers as well as wildcards to specify several versions at one time.

Option release depends on the Release file from an APT repository or from a CD. This option may be of no use at all if you're using package repositories that don't provide this file. You may see the contents of the Release files that you have on /var/lib/apt/lists/. The parameters for a release are: a (archive), c (components), v (version), o (origin) and l (label).

An example:

     Package: *
     Pin: release v=2.2*,a=stable,c=main,o=Debian,l=Debian
     Pin-Priority: 1001

In this example, we chose version 2.2* of Debian (which can be 2.2r2, 2.2r3 -- this accommodates "point releases" that typically include security fixes and other very important updates), the stable repository, section main (as opposed to contrib or non-free) and origin and label Debian. Origin (o=) defines who produced that Release file, the label (l=) defines the name of the distribution: Debian for Debian itself and Progeny for Progeny, for example. A sample Release file:

     $ cat /var/lib/apt/lists/ftp.debian.org.br_debian_dists_potato_main_binary-i386_Release
     Archive: stable
     Version: 2.2r3
     Component: main
     Origin: Debian
     Label: Debian
     Architecture: i386
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox
Print/export