Unified Modeling Language

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Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a standardized general-purpose modeling language in the field of object-oriented software engineering. The Unified Modeling Language includes a set of graphic notation techniques to create visual models of object-oriented software-intensive systems.

The Unified Modeling Language was developed by Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and Jim Rumbaugh at Rational Software in the 1990s. It was adopted by the Object Management Group (OMG) in 1997, and has been managed by this organisation ever since. In 2000 the Unified Modeling Language was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as industry standard for modeling software-intensive systems.

Unified Modeling Language is used to specify, visualize, modify, construct and document the artifacts of an object-oriented software-intensive system under development. The metamodeling architecture of Unified Modeling Language (UML) is defined in the Meta-Object Facility (MOF).

Contents

About

Unified Modeling Language (UML) combines techniques from data modeling (entity relationship diagrams), business modeling (work flows), object modeling, and component modeling. It can be used with all processes, throughout the software development life cycle, and across different implementation technologies.

The Unified Modeling Language (UML) offers a standard way to visualize a system's architectural blueprints, including elements such as:

  • Activities
  • Actor
  • Business process
  • Database
  • Logical Component (UML)
  • Programming language
  • Reusable software components

UML has synthesized the notations of the Booch method, the Object-modeling technique (OMT) and Object-oriented software engineering (OOSE) by fusing them into a single, common and widely usable modeling language. UML aims to be a standard modeling language which can model concurrent and distributed systems.

UML models may be automatically transformed to other representations (e.g. Java) by means of QVT-like transformation languages. UML is extensible, with two mechanisms for customization: Profiles and Stereotypes.

UML is not a development method by itself. However, it was designed to be compatible with the leading object-oriented software development methods of its time Object-modeling technique, Booch method, Objectory. Since UML has evolved, some of these methods have been recast to take advantage of the new notations (for example OMT), and new methods have been created based on UML, such as IBM Rational Unified Process (RUP). Others include Abstraction Method and Dynamic Systems Development Method.

Modeling

It is important to distinguish between the UML model and the set of diagrams of a system. A diagram is a partial graphic representation of a system's model. The model also contains documentation that drives the model elements and diagrams (such as written use cases).

UML diagrams represent two different views of a system model:

  • Static (or structural) view: emphasizes the static structure of the system using objects, attributes, operations and relationships. The structural view includes class diagrams and composite structure diagrams.
  • Dynamic (or behavioral) view: emphasizes the dynamic behavior of the system by showing collaborations among objects and changes to the internal states of objects. This view includes sequence diagrams, activity diagrams and state machine diagrams.

UML models can be exchanged among UML tools by using the XMI interchange format.

Diagrams

UML 2.2 has 14 types of diagrams divided into two categories. Seven diagram types represent structural information, and the other seven represent general types of behavior, including four that represent different aspects of interactions. These diagrams can be categorized hierarchically as shown in the following class diagram:

Hierarchy of UML 2.2 Diagrams, shown as a class diagram.

Static/ Structural Diagrams

Class diagram

In software engineering, a class diagram in the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a type of static structure diagram that describes the structure of a system by showing the system's classes, their attributes, operations (or methods), and the relationships among the classes.

Component diagram

In the Unified Modeling Language, a component diagram depicts how components are wired together to form larger components and or software systems. They are used to illustrate the structure of arbitrarily complex systems.

Composite structure diagram

Composite structure diagram in the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a type of static structure diagram, that shows the internal structure of a class and the collaborations that this structure makes possible.

This diagram can include internal parts, ports through which the parts interact with each other or through which instances of the class interact with the parts and with the outside world, and connectors between parts or ports. A composite structure is a set of interconnected elements that collaborate at runtime to achieve some purpose. Each element has some defined role in the collaboration.

Deployment diagram

A deployment diagram in the Unified Modeling Language models the physical deployment of artifacts on nodes. To describe a web site, for example, a deployment diagram would show what hardware components ("nodes") exist (e.g., a web server, an application server, and a database server), what software components ("artifacts") run on each node (e.g., web application, database), and how the different pieces are connected (e.g. JDBC, REST, RMI).

The nodes appear as boxes, and the artifacts allocated to each node appear as rectangles within the boxes. Nodes may have subnodes, which appear as nested boxes. A single node in a deployment diagram may conceptually represent multiple physical nodes, such as a cluster of database servers.

There are two types of Nodes .

  1. Device Node
  2. Execution Environment Node
Object diagram

An object diagram in the Unified Modeling Language (UML), is a diagram that shows a complete or partial view of the structure of a modeled system at a specific time.

Package diagram

A package diagram in the Unified Modeling Language depicts the dependencies between the packages that make up a model.

In addition to the standard UML Dependency relationship, there are two special types of dependencies defined between packages:

  • package import
  • package merge

A package import is "a relationship between an importing namespace and a package, indicating that the importing namespace adds the names of the members of the package to its own namespace." By default, an unlabeled dependency between two packages is interpreted as a package import relationship. In this relationship, elements within the target package will be imported in source package.

A package merge is "a directed relationship between two packages, that indicates that the contents of the two packages are to be combined. It is very similar to Generalization in the sense that the source element conceptually adds the characteristics of the target element to its own characteristics resulting in an element that combines the characteristics of both" In this relationship, if an element exists within both the source package and the target package then the source element's definition will be expanded to include the target element's definition.

Profile diagram

A profile diagram operates at the metamodel level to show stereotypes as classes with the <<stereotype>> stereotype, and profiles as packages with the <<profile>> stereotype. The extension relation (solid line with closed, filled arrowhead) indicates what metamodel element a given stereotype is extending.

Dynamic/ Behavioural Diagrams

Activity diagram

Activity diagrams are graphical representations of workflows of stepwise activities and actions with support for choice, iteration and concurrency. In the Unified Modeling Language, activity diagrams can be used to describe the business and operational step-by-step workflows of components in a system. An activity diagram shows the overall flow of control.

Communication diagram

A communication diagram in the Unified Modeling Language (UML) 2.0, is a simplified version of the UML 1.x collaboration diagram.

UML has four types of interaction diagrams:

  • Sequence diagram
  • Communication diagram
  • Interaction overview diagram
  • Timing diagram

A Communication diagram models the interactions between objects or parts in terms of sequenced messages. Communication diagrams represent a combination of information taken from Class, Sequence, and Use Case Diagrams describing both the static structure and dynamic behavior of a system.

However, communication diagrams use the free-form arrangement of objects and links as used in Object diagrams. In order to maintain the ordering of messages in such a free-form diagram, messages are labeled with a chronological number and placed near the link the message is sent over. Reading a communication diagram involves starting at message 1.0, and following the messages from object to object.

Communication diagrams show a lot of the same information as sequence diagrams, but because of how the information is presented, some of it is easier to find in one diagram than the other. Communication diagrams show which elements each one interacts with better, but sequence diagrams show the order in which the interactions take place more clearly.

Interaction overview diagram

Interaction Overview Diagram is one of the fourteen types of diagrams of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can picture a control flow with nodes that can contain interaction diagrams.

The interaction overview diagram is similar to the activity diagram both visualizing a sequence of activities. The difference is that the individual activity in the interaction overview diagram is pictured as a frame, which can contain interaction - or sequence diagrams. These interaction/sequence diagrams are constructed with building blocks like: sequence, communication, interaction overview and timing diagram. The nodes in the diagram connect these sequence diagrams, which can be place in a specific order. With these elements the interaction overview diagram can be used to "deconstruct a complex scenario that would otherwise require multiple if-then-else paths to be illustrated as a single sequence diagram".

Except for the activity nodes the other notation elements for interaction overview diagrams are the same as for activity diagrams, such as initial, final, decision, merge, fork and join nodes. The two new elements in the interaction overview diagrams are the "interaction occurrences" and "interaction elements".

Sequence diagram

A sequence diagram in a Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a kind of interaction diagram that shows how processes operate with one another and in what order. It is a construct of a Message Sequence Chart. A sequence diagram shows object interactions arranged in time sequence. It depicts the objects and classes involved in the scenario and the sequence of messages exchanged between the objects needed to carry out the functionality of the scenario. Sequence diagrams typically (but not always), are associated with use case realizations in the Logical View of the system under development.

Sequence diagrams are sometimes called event diagrams, event scenarios, and timing diagrams.

State diagram

A state diagram is a type of diagram used in computer science and related fields to describe the behavior of systems. State diagrams require that the system described is composed of a finite number of states; sometimes, this is indeed the case, while at other times this is a reasonable abstraction. Many forms of state diagrams exist, which differ slightly and have different semantics.

Timing diagram

A timing diagram in the Unified Modeling Language 2.0 is a specific type of interaction diagram, where the focus is on timing constraints.

Timing diagrams are used to explore the behaviors of objects throughout a given period of time. A timing diagram is a special form of a sequence diagram. The differences between timing diagram and sequence diagram are the axes are reversed so that the time is increased from left to right and the lifelines are shown in separate compartments arranged vertically.

Use case diagram

A use case diagram at its simplest is a graphical representation of a user's interaction with the system and depicting the specifications of a use case. A use case diagram can portray the different types of users of a system and the various ways that they interact with the system. This type of diagram is typically used in conjunction with the textual use case and will often be accompanied by other types of diagrams as well.

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